Turkey, Greece agree to resume talks after four years in Istanbul

Reuters

Turkey and Greece have agreed to resume talks over their contested maritime claims in the eastern Mediterranean after a four year hiatus following weeks of tensions that culminated in a collision between their warships.

The talks, which broke off in 2016 after 60 rounds that made little progress over 14 years, will resume in “the near future” in Istanbul, the Greek Foreign Ministry said in a statement, without elaborating.

Turkey also gave no timing for a resumption of the talks but a senior official said they could begin by the end of the month. “There are positive developments,” the official said.

Tensions flared last month after Ankara sent its Oruç Reis seismic survey ship into disputed waters, escorted by gunboats, to map out sea territory for possible oil and gas drilling.

A Turkish and a Greek warship collided during the standoff.

Since then, Turkey has recalled the Oruç Reis, saying the move would allow for diplomacy ahead of an EU summit where members Greece, Cyprus and France are pushing for tough action against Turkey. The meeting was postponed on Sept. 22 to Oct. 1-2.

On Sept. 22, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan held a video summit with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose country has mediated in the dispute, and EU Council President Charles Michel.

“At the summit, where developments in the eastern Mediterranean were … discussed, it was stated that Turkey and Greece are ready to start exploratory talks,” Turkey’s presidency said in a statement.

Ömer Çelik, spokesman for Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), said preparations for the resumption of talks were under way and that the two sides were working on the parameters.

Erdoğan said he hoped the EU summit would bring new impetus to Turkey-EU ties, adding steps on updating a customs union between the two sides, visa-free travel and migration would help put ties on a positive basis.

In a video address to the U.N. General Assembly, Erdoğan also called for a regional conference of Mediterranean coastal states, which he said should include the breakaway Turkish Cypriots, to address maritime disputes.

Turkey has two oil and gas exploration ships in waters off the coast of the divided island of Cyprus, angering authorities in Nicosia. Ankara does not recognize the southern Greek Cypriot government on the divided island, and is the only country to recognise the Turkish Cypriot state to the north.

Turkey has also signed a maritime demarcation deal with Libya which conflicts with a rival deal between Greece and Egypt.

Erdoğan said Turkey preferred to solve disagreements “justly and in an appropriate way” through talks, but added that “futile” attempts to exclude Turkey from plans in the eastern Mediterranean could not succeed.

from Duvar English https://ift.tt/2G15dX0

About CHP EU Representation

The CHP was founded on 9 September 1923, about one and half month before the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey. The first President of modern Turkey’s oldest party was M. Kemal Atatürk. Today CHP is a social-democratic party, member of the Socialist International and associate member of the Socialist Group at the European Parliament. The scope of the CHP bureau in Brussels is not limited to the bilateral framework of Turkey's EU accession process. Issues such as the information society, energy policies, social development, climate change, international trade and security are among the different focus areas. The EU-Turkey relations are about integration and need multiple, plural and horizontal channels of communication. The CHP supports and promotes Turkey's EU membership process also by being more present and active in Brussels The CHP's Representative to the EU is Ms Kader Sevinç who previously worked as an MEP advisor at the European Parliament and in the private sector.
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